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  • Theology
  • English
  • Mathematics
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  • Social Studies
  • Latin
  • Foreign Language
  • Computers
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  • Social Studies

    U.S. History II 1850-Present
    American History 1850-Present is a course that will focus on the rapid economic, political, and social changes in the United States through this time period. It will cover the period from 1850 to present, and focus on U.S. developments and accomplishments. This course will emphasize America’s involvement in both world wars as well as their participation in global conflicts and limited wars. Additionally, the students will be responsible for analyzing current events, evaluating the changes that occurred in the recent centuries (20th and 21st) and how they affect our country today, assessing their impact on current and future societies.

    Also available: Honors U.S. History II 1850-Present

    U.S. History II
    American History II is a course that will focus on the rapid economic, political, and social changes in the United States in the 20th century. It will cover the period from 1865 to the present. American History II will emphasize America’s involvement in both world wars as well as their participation in global conflicts and limited wars. Additionally, the students will be responsible for analyzing current events, evaluating the changes that occurred in the 20th century and how they affect our country today, and assessing their impact on current and future society.

    Also available: Honors U.S. History II

    American Government
    American Government will mainly focus on the workings of our government and the concepts of our democracy as established in the U.S. Constitution from its foundation to its ever-changing present. Students in this course will study about the activities and composition of the three levels of government as was as the branches of government. Other issues, such as voting, non-voting, the formation and roles of political parties and the issues and candidates concerning local, state, and national elections, will also be studied. Additionally, international events and issues as they relate to U.S. policy will be examined and discussed as these events unfold.

    Also available: Honors American Government

    Advanced Placement American History
    Advanced Placement U.S. History is offered to select students in the senior Social Studies program. Students will engage in an outlined course of study emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through considerable classroom time spent mastering techniques of essay writing and analyzing historical documents. The students will describe the major political, economic, social, literary, and cultural history of the United States. An examination using the standard test from the Advanced Placement Program will be given in May. Participating students must take the A.P. Examination upon completion of the course. This evaluation score can qualify the student for undergraduate college credit.

    Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics
    AP United States Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will be expected to become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes.

    American History III
    The purpose of this course is to expand on American History II. This course is offered to seniors in addition to the American Government course. The course will examine American History from World War II through the present day with a great emphasis on presidencies and major events (i.e., Civil Rights, Korea, Vietnam, Middle East, etc.).

    World Geography and International Relations
    Through this course, students gain a greater awareness of the world community in which they live. The content focuses on the physical, cultural and economic geography of various nations in Europe, Asia, South America, North America and Africa, as well as emphasizing map skills and general geographic concepts and themes. This course will also examine political and economic systems throughout the world. This course will examine world relations, focusing on areas of conflict and turmoil.

    Criminal Law
    This course is designed to assist students with identification of criminal behaviors and activities. The course defines crime and helps students to classify the different categories of crimes. Students will also examine the philosophies of criminals and identify causes and effects of crime on individuals and society. This course will also identify the individual rights of the accused and the constitutionality of crime and criminals.

    Study Skills
    This course focuses on setting goals, time management, note taking, learning styles, tracking on Edline, organizational skills, classroom expectations, learning environment, reading and studying specific courses, following directions, test taking skills, reducing anxiety, and some life and stress management skills.

    Life Skills
    This course is designed to provide common sense oriented life skills, relevant to a variety of life areas. Included are: student input on life skills ideas, character development, reviewing the driver’s manual, focus on finding a career, managing finances, checkbook application, and discussion of credit card usage.

    Psychology
    Psychology is an elective course that surveys the science of psychology, its theoretical foundations, and practical applications. The areas surveyed include motivation, emotion, learning, sensation and perception, personality, social behavior and techniques of measurement and developmental psychology. It includes both individual and group activities.

    Sociology
    Sociology emphasizes learning through inquiry requiring a high level of student participation. Students study the elements of sociological theory and the elements of social research while investigating the various societies, their customs, cultures, institutional roles, and social problems such as: poverty, racism, drugs, delinquency, alcoholism, child abuse, and teenage suicide. Role-playing is encouraged.

    Mythology
    The student is first introduced to a proper background of Mythological terminology, names, symbols and historical folklore. This is followed by a concentrated study of the writings of Homer, especially the Iliad and the Odyssey. Finally, the manner in which the people of that time perceived the gods, the nature of man and the problems of life are explored.
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