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  • Theology
  • English
  • Mathematics
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  • Social Studies
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  • Foreign Language
  • Computers
  • Health and P.E.
  • Visual Arts
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  • Sciences

    Physical Science
    Physical Science introduces the student to the scientific method as it applies to the sciences of chemistry and physics. The basics of these two sciences are examined as pure science and as they relate to everyday life and industry. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. An understanding of the S.I. system is developed through use and application. This course is designed to serve as a solid foundation for those students taking later courses in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. A calculator is required for this course.

    Also Available: Conceptual Physical Science and Honors Physical Science

    Biology
    Biology is the study of living things. Its primary purpose is to relate and develop an appreciation of and respect for all living things. All levels of biological organization are discussed from the molecule through cells, tissues, organs, individuals, populations, species, communities and the world biome. Major topics include: scientific method, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, classification, and the diversity of life. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. This Biology course is recommended for college bound students and is required for a career in science, nursing, medicine and related fields.

    Also available: Conceptual Biology and Honors Biology

    Honors Biology II
    Honors Biology II, an advanced science elective, introduces new topics that are a continuation of Honors Biology. Because this class emphasizes depth of understanding, a limited number of topics are selected for study. Examples of course material include, but are not limited to, biochemistry, animal behavior, evolutionary biology, genetics, and structure and function of organisms. Scientific articles from a variety of sources and special projects are used to enrich the course. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. This class is recommended for students who are interested in a major in the life sciences or have an interest in specific biological concepts. Students are required to work at an accelerated pace, utilize higher level thinking skills, and submit high quality work.

    Advanced Placement Biology
    Advanced Placement Biology is an accelerated course designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory Biology course. It places emphasis on the major concepts of biology including cells, heredity, evolution, organisms and populations. This course will prepare students for the AP Biology examination, which at some institutions may be used as college credit. Due to the intensive nature of this course, it will be necessary for students to complete work outside of standard class time. This includes preparatory work for the course over the summer and a required laboratory portion of the course will be held after school hours. A test will be given during the first week of school on the independent summer coursework. All students who enroll in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

    Chemistry
    Chemistry is a physical science dealing chiefly with the microstructure of matter and all aspects and implications of the structure. Chemistry introduces the student to the mathematical analysis and the verification of the concepts and laws of chemistry. The principle of atomic structure is used to explain the differences occurring in the various types of matter and the changes in composition that matter can undergo. Some course topics included are: the gas laws, nuclear chemistry, the mole concept, carbon chemistry, the modern theories of acids and bases and different types of chemical reactions. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. Chemistry is necessary for anyone planning careers in science, medicine, nursing, engineering and related fields. A calculator is required.

    Also available: Conceptual Chemistry I and Honors Chemistry I

    Honors Chemistry II
    This advanced course is a comprehensive study of the laws, theories and principles of chemistry, emphasizing problem-solving techniques. The major topics covered in this course are molecular structure, thermochemistry, reaction spontaneity, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, oxidation-reduction reactions and solubility prediction. This course uses a college level textbook and requires independent student work. Students are required to work at an accelerated pace, utilize higher level thinking skills, and submit high quality work. A calculator is required.

    Advanced Placement Chemistry
    This advanced course is a comprehensive study of the laws, theories, and principles of chemistry, with a heavy emphasis on problem-solving techniques and drawing conclusions. The major topics covered in this course include chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, carbon chemistry, and acids and bases. This course uses a college level textbook and requires laboratory work after school and independent student work during the summer months prior to the beginning of the school year. A test will be given during the first week of school on the independent summer course work. All students who enroll in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. A calculator is required.

    Physics
    Physics is a study of the physical world as seen through matter-energy relationships. This classical approach to the study of physics acquaints students with the fundamental physical laws and enables development of logical thought processes. Thus, this course is designed to help students think and analyze problems in the real world. This physics course will cover measurement, linear motion, two-dimensional motion, sound, light, Newton’s Laws of Motion, impulse and momentum, energy, wave motion, and electricity. Vectors are used in certain subject areas. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. Since a mathematical approach is emphasized, a calculator is required.

    Also available: Conceptual Physics and Honors Physics

    Human Anatomy
    Human Anatomy is designed for students who are interested in a career that involves the structure and function of the human body. The emphasis for this course is the anatomy of the human body. Some attention will be given to human physiology. Laboratory work is an important component of the curriculum. Students will examine a variety of preserved specimens and examine objects under the microscope. Scientific articles are utilized to discuss current research information as well as historical information. Special projects may be assigned. This course is recommended for students contemplating a career in the sciences, especially a medically-related field.

    Also available: Honors Anatomy and Physiology

    Environmental Science
    This interdisciplinary class is of special interest to the student who is interested in environmental issues. The history of environmental science, major concepts in environmental science, and current topics are the focus of the course. Scientific articles from a variety of sources are used to enrich the curriculum. Laboratory work and special projects enhance the curriculum. This course is recommended for college bound students who anticipate a career in the sciences as well as those with a specific interest in environmental science. Local environmental issues will be examined

    Forensic Science
    Forensic science is a quickly growing and competitive field. Forensic science will focus on the crime scene, trace evidence (e.g., DNA fingerprinting), document analysis, entomology, forensic anthropology, and portrayal in the media. Laboratory work is an essential component of the curriculum. This course is intended for college bound students who anticipate a career in science as well as those with a special interest in forensic science.

    Science in the Media
    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to how science is communicated through different media formats. The main area of focus for this course will be the following: science as presented in science fiction films and literature (e.g., Star Trek, The Walking Dead, Brave New World), deciphering how science is presented to the general public through television, internet and news articles, and how to communicate science topics effectively to a larger audience through the creation of video, podcasts, blogs, and print articles. Special attention will be paid to scientific accuracy, ethics, bias, and politics in these media sources.

    Introduction to Design and Basic Engineering
    Careers in design and engineering fields take abstract ideas and apply science and mathematics to build products to meet the needs of mankind. This course will explore principles of engineering and design fields through a project-based learning approach, which incorporates the areas of science, technology, art, and mathematics (STEAM). For example, students will have the opportunity to use modeling supplies to construct prototypes, work with computer modeling software, learn about the basics of circuitry, and be introduced to computer programming syntax and theories needed to run computer operations and create code for video games. Emphasis will be placed on the engineering design process. Students will also have the opportunity to explore trends, current innovation, and career opportunities. Grades will be based on student process and products, assignments, and reflections.
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